Nacogdoches County, Texas

Friday, November 24, 2017


Register to Vote or Update Your Address

There are several ways listed below that you can register to vote or update your address information:

Visit VoteTexas.gov fill out a voter registration application online, print it, sign it, and mail it to the Nacogdoches County Elections Office – 203 W. Main St. – Nacogdoches, TX 75961.

Visit the Nacogdoches County Elections Office in person and fill out a voter registration application.

Call the Nacogdoches County Elections Office at (936) 560-7825 and request a voter registration application.

If you need to update your voter registration address in Nacogdoches County, and you believe that you are already registered to vote in Nacogdoches County, you may confirm that you are already registered to vote in Nacogdoches County by visiting here, and you may then visit here to update your address online. This option is only for voters who are already registered to vote in Nacogdoches County, and need to change their Nacogdoches County addresses. If you are not already registered to vote in Nacogdoches County, you will need to use one of the other options listed above to register to vote.

*Note – Often the Nacogdoches County Elections Office receives calls regarding registering to vote by party affiliation, or requests to change party affiliation. In some States, you do register to vote by party, but in Texas you simply register to vote. Texas has open primaries, meaning at the beginning of each year all voters have clean slates as far as party affiliation is concerned, and voters may freely choose to vote in either the Democratic Primary or Republican Primary in even numbered years once they arrive at polling places. When the General Election arrives in November of even numbered years, all voters essentially receive the same ballot¹ and all Democratic, Green, Libertarian, Republican, and Independent candidates are listed for voters to choose from². Voters have the option to vote Straight Party ballots in November General Elections in even numbered years, or voters may vote split tickets choosing candidates from different political parties in different contests. During Primaries, all candidates on a political party’s ballot are from the same party, so there are no Straight Party and Split Ticket voting options because the parties are narrowing down which of their candidates will advance to the November General election to face candidates from other parties, as well as independents and eligible Write-In candidates.

¹With the exception of local Commissioner Precinct level contests.
²The names of eligible Write-In candidates will be posted in the voting booths.